billion year old carbon


decidedlylazy:

Me.

decidedlylazy:

Me.


"I’m still a punk, I just have a tailor now." 

Nick Cave, freely translated back to English from http://sz-magazin.sueddeutsche.de/texte/anzeigen/42198 (via andicriedmercy)

(Source: pumpkinsareback)


There is nothing wrong with loving the crap out of everything. Negative people find their walls. So never apologise for your enthusiasm. Never. Ever. Never.

- Ryan Adams


turnofthecentury:

A Female Reportage Photographer Surveys Berlin (c. 1910) Women in journalistic professions were a rarity in Wilhelmine Germany. Nonetheless, some women did succeed in establishing themselves as journalists – initially, they did so by working for the women’s newspapers and magazines that had been around since the middle of the nineteenth century; later on, they also worked for large newspapers. In this photograph (c. 1910), a female photographer surveys metropolitan Berlin from a crane being used in the construction of the Stadthaus [City Hall] on Molkenmarkt. The City Hall was built as an extension of the Rotes Rathaus [Red City Hall], whose large tower can be seen at the right. The Berliner Dom [Berlin Cathedral] can be seen in the background off to the left. 
via GHDI

turnofthecentury:

A Female Reportage Photographer Surveys Berlin (c. 1910) Women in journalistic professions were a rarity in Wilhelmine Germany. Nonetheless, some women did succeed in establishing themselves as journalists – initially, they did so by working for the women’s newspapers and magazines that had been around since the middle of the nineteenth century; later on, they also worked for large newspapers. In this photograph (c. 1910), a female photographer surveys metropolitan Berlin from a crane being used in the construction of the Stadthaus [City Hall] on Molkenmarkt. The City Hall was built as an extension of the Rotes Rathaus [Red City Hall], whose large tower can be seen at the right. The Berliner Dom [Berlin Cathedral] can be seen in the background off to the left.
via GHDI



Oct 15th at 4PM / via: livedublin / op: livedublin / 7 notes

livedublin:

Warpaint - Jubilee - Dublin May 2011


topicalsolution:

play only grouper at my funeral


Oct 13th at 6PM / via: archaeology / op: archaeology / 367 notes
archaeology:


Take with a grain of salt, but still!


A “vampire grave” containing a skeleton with a stake driven through its chest has been unearthed by a man known as “Bulgaria’s Indiana Jones”.




Professor Nikolai Ovcharov – a crusading archaeologist who has dedicated his life to unearthing mysteries of ancient civilisations – said that he had made the discovery while excavating the ruins of Perperikon, an ancient Thracian city located in southern Bulgaria, close to the border with Greece.


The city, inhabited since 5,000 BC but only discovered 20 years ago, is believed to be the site of the Temple of Dionysius – the Greek God of wine and fertility. And among the finds at the site, which includes a hilltop citadel, a fortress and a sanctuary, are a series of “vampire graves”.


On Thursday Professor Ovcharov announced that he had found a remarkably-preserved Medieval skeleton at the site in what he termed “a vampire grave”.




"We have no doubts that once again we’re seeing an anti-vampire ritual being carried out," said Professor Ovcharov. He explained that the metal was driven through the corpse to stop a "bad" person from rising from the dead and terrorising the living.
"Often they were applied to people who had died in unusual circumstances – such as suicide."
The skeleton, thought to be of a man aged between 40 and 50, had a heavy piece of ploughshare – an iron rod, used in a plough – hammered through its chest. The left leg below the knee had also been removed and left beside the skeleton.

via

archaeology:

Take with a grain of salt, but still!

A “vampire grave” containing a skeleton with a stake driven through its chest has been unearthed by a man known as “Bulgaria’s Indiana Jones”.

Professor Nikolai Ovcharov – a crusading archaeologist who has dedicated his life to unearthing mysteries of ancient civilisations – said that he had made the discovery while excavating the ruins of Perperikon, an ancient Thracian city located in southern Bulgaria, close to the border with Greece.

The city, inhabited since 5,000 BC but only discovered 20 years ago, is believed to be the site of the Temple of Dionysius – the Greek God of wine and fertility. And among the finds at the site, which includes a hilltop citadel, a fortress and a sanctuary, are a series of “vampire graves”.

On Thursday Professor Ovcharov announced that he had found a remarkably-preserved Medieval skeleton at the site in what he termed “a vampire grave”.

"We have no doubts that once again we’re seeing an anti-vampire ritual being carried out," said Professor Ovcharov. He explained that the metal was driven through the corpse to stop a "bad" person from rising from the dead and terrorising the living.

"Often they were applied to people who had died in unusual circumstances – such as suicide."

The skeleton, thought to be of a man aged between 40 and 50, had a heavy piece of ploughshare – an iron rod, used in a plough – hammered through its chest. The left leg below the knee had also been removed and left beside the skeleton.

via


king-jeremy:

Lula Carson Smith. Febrero 19 de 1917, Septiembre 29 de 1967.
"The heart is a lonely hunter…"

king-jeremy:

Lula Carson Smith. Febrero 19 de 1917, Septiembre 29 de 1967.

"The heart is a lonely hunter…"


honeypowers:

Kevin Shields, 1989. Photo by Richard Bellia.

honeypowers:

Kevin Shields, 1989. Photo by Richard Bellia.


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